Impact of NU Research
Research conducted at the University of Nebraska has a significant impact on the state’s economy. Our research focuses on areas of importance to people in Nebraska and throughout the world, including:
  • alternative energy and energy conservation
  • water management
  • agricultural productivity and profitability
  • cancer
  • diabetes
  • AIDS/HIV
  • neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases
  • obesity and other public health issues
  • early childhood education and intervention
  • new strategies to increase the interest of Nebraska K-12 students in science and math, including robotics.

These are just a few of the areas in which university research is strengthening the state's economy by spawning new businesses and attracting companies that want to grow in a technology-rich, innovation-focused environment.
  • The University of Nebraska is among the top 30 public universities in R&D expenditures according to the National Science Foundation, with more than $330 million in expenditures in 2006. Expenditures include federal, state, industry and institutional funds.
  • In 2007-08, the University of Nebraska was awarded more than $178 million in competitive research grants from federal, state and industry sources.
  • According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, 31 jobs are created in Nebraska for every $1 million of academic R&D. Thus, University of Nebraska research and development activity supports more than 10,000 Nebraska jobs.
  • Nearly half of our nation’s basic research is conducted by research universities; it is the source of innovation, technological leadership, medical breakthroughs and economic development.
  • Students at the University of Nebraska have unprecedented opportunities to participate in research, even as undergraduates. This allows them to work alongside top faculty and gives them a significant edge in the workplace.
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